Ronit Urbino Peter

The beauty of these wind chimes is in the details and colors. They are the creations of Israel-based artist, Ronit Urbino Peter. We don’t have much information on the maker but you can see more of her work on Facebook and Pictaram. Her beaded chimes and home decor can be purchased in her Etsy shop.

Images: Courtesy of Ronit Urbino Peter.

Rie Taniguchi

If you love nature as much as we do you will probably appreciate these life forms created by UK-based metalsmith, Rie Taniguchi. Her pieces incorporate sterling silver, gold, semiprecious stones. She describes her work in an artist statement on Mobilia-Gallery:

“I make objects to look at or to wear, mainly in the shapes of various life forms, focusing on endangered species. I draw my inspiration freely from everything I see, read and hear. My main interests and concerns, aside from the arts, are in environment and wildlife. News, documentaries, folk tales and myths all come into consideration. I try to express the essence of life with satire and playfulness, portraying animals within their environments or in a situation when possible. The aim is to make it life-like rather than realistic. I am discovering that true animal forms are more fantastic than the fantastical and more challenging to make. Images from my childhood still influence me through the experience of making numerous drawings as I plan each piece. I draw from photographs, films and real life, before drawing from memory and designing.”

Images: Courtesy of Rie Taniguchi.

Ali Ferguson

Admiring these wooden samplers created by UK-based textile artist, Ali Ferguson.
The unique samplers are inspired by “stories from the sewing box”. A huge fan of junk shops and markets she creates the patterns using vintage fabrics, hand embroidered table linens, lace and a variety of found materials. On an interview with Textile Artist she says this about her work:

“Although I would describe myself as a textile artist, I work with a variety of materials. I always incorporate hand stitch into my pieces and I think, for me, this is one of the most important elements. There is something very personal about making your own mark with needle and thread.”


“My choice of materials is influenced by my theme. For example a couple of years ago I was part of an exhibiting group who were working towards an exhibition entitled “Environment”. I chose to explore this by working with driftwood and exploring how I could stitch into it, stitch pieces of wood together and transfer photographic images onto it. This was the start of my “Environmentals” series of driftwood pieces. I am currently back working with wood as I am just starting a series of “Patchwood Quilts” or samplers made from bed slats. This is exciting me greatly and I have loads of further developments buzzing around my head at the moment.”

“As to techniques – let’s just say that these current pieces involve a great deal of drilling!”

You can view more of her work on her website, Facebook and Instagram.

Images: Courtesy of Ali Ferguson.