Junko Oki

Textile artist Junko Oki lives and works in Kamakura, Japan and began her embroidery career in her 40s. She calls her work “Woky Shoten” meaning ‘free movement of the line to make a simple repetition of work’. Her intricate free form embroidery have a vintage quality and often features a cross in her designs. She reveals a bit about herself in the quotes we have gathered:

“Collectively, the works were none other than a reflection of me, maybe even embarrassingly so. I desired to expose myself even more through my works; I wanted to be true to myself. What else matters? That is the one thing I know that I am good at.”

“Even if you find a tangled-up thread, you don’t have to cut it off, you can leave it to create a new pattern. In other words the path is endless and you can keep on going – no turning back.”

’When I have needles, threads, and other special materials in front of me, something stirs deep inside my unconscious mind in spite of myself, and I am filled with strong emotion.That is when I regain my true self’ 

You can follow the artist on here on her website.

Images: Courtesy of Junko Oki.

Tuija Heikkinen

Tuija Heikkinen is a textile designer and Arts and Crafts teacher from Rovaniemi, Finland. She crochets individual elements and arranges them into these very appealing compositions. The fibre artist is also proficient in sewing, knitting and embroidery examples of which can be seen on her Instagram account.

Images: Courtesy of Tuija Heikkinen.

Suzanne Sullivan

Suzanne Sullivan is an Oregon-born ceramist now living and working in Brooklyn where she creates textile, jewelry, pottery, and ceramics. We love her ceramic pieces with its rough surfaces and contrasting geometric patterns. On The Star Whisperer she relates this about herself:

“I like the idea of the artist as a kind of design factory, prepared to tackle all kinds of issues, whether they be extraordinary or mundane.”

“I like the things in our every day world that are not mass-produced, things that have fingerprints on them. At home, I collect twigs and sticks and nests, special rocks, pieces of small nothings from the natural world, and a lot of times, my ceramics become vessels for these things.”

You can follow the artist on Facebook and view more of her work on Instagram.

Images: Courtesy of Suzanne Sullivan.