Sabra Field

One of our favorite destination in the U.S. is Vermont so it is fitting that we feature one of their most prominent printmaker, Sabra Field. She was named “an Extraordinary Vermonter” by Governor Madeleine Kunin in 1990 and a “Vermont Living Treasure” by the Shelburne Craft School a decade later. We love her portrayals of the Vermont fields particularly her snow and evening landscapes. On Edgewater Gallery she says this about her career:

“Why did on earth I become a professional artist? No one said I couldn’t and I was too naive to realize the But mostly I wanted to spend all my time making images and I was willing to take the risk. I felt, in a sense, that I had no choice. I couldn’t be happy otherwise.”

“The career highs that sustain me are not glamorous by the standards of the wider world but they confirm that I made the right decision. I’ve reached the time of life artists dream of: a few commissions, sales of reproduction rights, a lot of time to think and dream and invent new images while I still have the strength and energy to make them come true. I hope you will find an image that speaks to you, that you will commit to it and live with it so that we may share that special relationship between artist and collector: I make it but you SEE it!”

You can follow the artist on her website and on Facebook.

Images: Courtesy of Sabra Field.

Rhian Swierat

Rhian Swierat is an artist and graphic designer living in Brooklyn who uses stitches
to record her memories and experiences of different places. Her abstract work are impressions from a specific time and place recorded on watercolor paper with paint and with silk and rayon thread. She describes her process as follows:

“Each piece starts with an idea, a place or time and I make small stitch sketches of each layer which become the palette of styles and forms to make the final piece. The sketches serve as a guide to my process since they are the singular recording of each memory. I see myself as a painter who uses thread. The colors are pure and unmixed and the layering of stitches gives shade variation. Each layer is highly detailed and tactile so the repeating of patterns serve as the non-verbal storytelling of my memories. This layering and abstraction allows for a viewer to search for my story in each composition and formulate their own understanding of each space.”

Images: Courtesy of Rhian Swierat.

Sue Binns

UK-based potter Sue Binns is largely self taught but has spent a few years under the guidance of the Montem School in the 80s. She produces a wide array of functional domestic stoneware with her distinctive stripe patterns. In a statement on Beside the Wave she writes:

“I’m fascinated by the way stripes create different visual impressions, positive or negative, depending on their thickness and density’. She draws inspiration from 1950s Rye Pottery, which she grew up near, as well as Mediterranean pottery and Japanese fabrics and ceramics.”

You can follow the artist on her website and see more of her work on Instagram.

Images: Courtesy of Sue Binns.