Ruby Silvious

Artist and graphic designer Ruby Silvious has been experimenting and creating art on recycled and found materials. In 2015 she began a project called 363 Days of Tea, a visual daily record of her impression of the moment. She followed it up with 52 weeks of tea, 26 days of tea in Japan and 26 Days of tea in France. The used tea bags became her canvas on which she drew, painted and collaged using ink, watercolor, gouache and paper. This incredible series can be seen on her website and on Instagram.

Images: Courtesy of Ruby Silvious.

Atelier Mori

We know very little about this artisan but we do know that he creates traditional silk embroideries on kimonos and that he is also an embroidery writer and teacher. His web sites are labeled under the name, Atelier Mori and this modern stitching series is called ‘crossing’.

You can see more of his work on his website, Facebook and Instagram.

Images: Courtesy of Atelier Mori.

Chris Maynard

Washington-based artist Chris Maynard carves feathers into amazing art, using molted feathers that are all legal to have and sell in the United States. He creates his intricate art with tiny eye surgery scissors, forceps, scalpels and magnifiers. The artist has a background in biology and ecology and is a long-time member of the Audubon often contributing his art to conservation causes both local, national and international. To gain an insight into the artist we garnered a few quotes from his blog:

“An artist’s job is to create bridges between how the world actually is and how we experience it. An artist help us to see and experience the world from a different angle—whether it is emotional, conceptual, or just seeing things differently from how our brains are used to—like M.C. Escher does so well. It helps us not get too stuck in one way of seeing things. It allows us to be more flexible and adaptable.”

“Feathers are perfect by themselves so why make art with them? I do it to add meaning: to direct the viewer to ideas they can relate to. Giving meaning abstracts from the thing viewed.  The meaning is not the actual object seen. It involves assumptions which can be wrong.”

“Many people say my art is completely original but it is not. I mean I developed a technique using technologies already created, I use common accepted design practices, and I am influenced by other artist.”

The artist can be followed on his website, Facebook and Instagram.

Images: Courtesy of Chris Maynard.