Monthly Archives: May 2017

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Ingrid van den Brand

Loving these abstract designs created by artist, photographer and designer, Ingrid van den Brand.
She runs a creative studio, “Eye-Snacks”, in Eindhoven, the Netherlands. The artist embroiders as she draws replacing the pencil with needle, thread, and recycled materials. Her work is minimal and poetic.

You can see more of her work on her website, Facebook and Behance.

Images: Courtesy of Ingrid van den Brand.

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Linnéa N Kolbäck

Linnéa N Kolbäck is an illustrator and designer from Sweden with a simple retrostyle that we much admire. She believes in quality over quantity and that less is more. Inspired by the 50’s, 60’s and 70’s her work shows her love for dots, lines and screen printing.

You can view more of her work on her website, Facebook and Instagram.

Images: Courtesy of Linnéa N Kolbäck.

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Warren King

Warren King is an American born sculptor currently living and working in Stockholm. A trip to a village in China where many of his ancestors had lived is the inspiration for these life size cardboard sculptures. The abstracted shapes are created with glued cardboard and with the backs left unfinished and exposed. His goal is to recreate the village with perhaps a total of 100 to 200 figures. In an interview on Supermarket 2017 he reveals this about himself and his project:

“Hi! I’m Warren, and I do sculpture, mostly figures using cardboard from boxes. I’m pretty new to the art world — I only started doing it seriously about 2 years ago when I moved to Stockholm. Before that, I worked at software companies doing data analysis for big corporations, and before that I was a structural engineer designing stadiums and office buildings. Nowadays I cut cardboard full time.”

‘That project started after a visit to my grandparents’ hometown in China. It was my first time in China, and as we wandered around the streets we met some elderly residents and stopped to chat. As it turned out, these people knew my grandparents from 50 years ago. It was very profound — the sense of having lost touch with this part of my past, and then rediscovering it by chance. So this series of sculptures — which is an ongoing project to recreate the residents of that village one person at a time – is sort of an expression of my attempts to understand those connections.”

You can see more of his work on his website, Facebook and Instagram.

Images: Courtesy of Warren King.

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