Monthly Archives: February 2018

You are browsing the site archives by month.

Sara Impey

The sewing machine is the writing tool of textile artist Sara Impey who specializes in machine stitched lettering. The UK-based quiltmaker originally trained as a newspaper journalist inspired by words and narratives. We get an insight on the artist in her interview with Molly Makes:

“I began stitching text in 2004. I had wanted to do so for some time, and tried to find a way of incorporating it into my existing working methods which at the time consisted of elaborate repeated patterns using machine appliqué set against bold geometric backgrounds. I didn’t want the text to be an add-on, but an integral part of the design. My first text-based quilts were simply lists of related words or reproduced verses from Victorian samplers. It was when I started stitching my own writing that I felt I had finally found my ‘voice’ as a quilter – more than thirty years after making my first quilt. It was a very long apprenticeship! The text on my quilts is all free-motion machine stitching, letter by letter. I mention this because these days a lot of people assume it is digital embroidery.”

You can follow the artist on her website. Her book, ‘Text in Textile Art’ is available on Amazon.

Images: Courtesy of Sara Impey.

Tara O’Brien

Loving the work of Dublin-based illustrator Tara O’Brien. Her illustrations often focuses on the diverse representation of people, body politics and mental health. We love the muted palette and her delicate line work. Her whimsical style is simple, intricate and thoroughly appealing. On and interview with The Tiny Hobo she reveals this about herself:

“I would describe my art as being a continuous exploration of body image and an attempt to smash stigma. I don’t know if I have achieved that yet but that is the direction it is going.”

“Inspiration usually comes from however I am feeling that day, if I am feeling very good about myself or positive I will usually draw something empowering and happy! If I am having an off day then I will usually turn to art as a form of therapy. I’ll try to draw something positive, whether that is successful or not I don’t know!”

You can follow the artist and purchase a few prints on her website. She is also on Facebook and Instagram.

Images: Courtesy of Tara O’Brien.