Category Archives: Ceramics

Malene Hartmann Rasmussen

These ceramic masks are the works of Malene Hartmann Rasmussen, a Danish artist living in London.  Her work has been influenced by folk tales and mythological beings connected to everyday life in pagan Scandinavia.  Her aim is to create a visual poetry based on her own personal story.

You can see more of the artist’s work on her website, Facebook and Instagram.

Images:  Courtesy of Malene Hartmann Rasmussen

Kyoko Sugiura

Kyoko Sugiura is a graduate of Bunka Fashion College in Japan. She is the creator behind the brand, Kyoko Création Broderie, an atelier and shop in Paris. The artist uses a variety of hand embroidery techniques and materials that show the richness and complexity of her designs. Much of her work is inspired by the diversity of nature. The last four images show her collaborative
effort with Japanese ceramist, Akiko Hoshina.

You can view more of her work on her website, Facebook and Instagram.

Images: Courtesy of Kyoko Sugiura.

Save

Zemer Peled

Admiring the intricate work of ceramist Zemer Peled. The Israeli artist examines the beauty and brutality of the natural world and uses slivers of porcelain to mirror their shapes and forms. On an interview with Cfile.org. she gives us an insight into her work:

“The sculptures I make are formed of ceramic shards, constructing them into large-scale/small-scale sculptures and installations. I am producing the shards myself using the slab roller; I make sheets of clay, fire them, and smash them into pieces with a hammer. I love playing with the idea of the texture and the form can look airy, delicate, light and fluffy and to give a sense of flutter, as if my breath would break it. Yet, the hard and sharp shards can be seen as round and moving, and give a sense of softness.”

“Process is crucial to my sculptural ideas. They are consistent with the Kabbalah concepts of Shevirah (breaking) and Tikkun (mending) that can also be considered as renewal. I make, then break, then make again. Chaos, destruction, and decay are intense and necessary creative process for me to create each of my sculptures.”

You can purchase a few of her work on her website and you can follow her also on Facebook and Instagram.

Images: Courtesy of Zemer Peled.