Category Archives: Graphic Design

Jason Munn

Wisconsin native Jason Munn now calls Oakland, California his home. He started his career with a love of independent music and design and in 2003 he founded his studio, The Small Stakes, where he produces designs for a wide range of products. The artist is best known for his poster designs, which are concept-driven and restrained, keeping only what is essential to the composition. On an interview with Grain Edit he discusses his use of found imagery:

“At first I wasn’t confident in my abilities to draw etc. Plus it was a huge part of the learning process for me. I was learning how images work together but, as I became more confident, I started to incorporate more illustration into my work.”

And on Teen Vogue he says this:

“My early work used a lot of found imagery or combined multiple pieces of found imagery to create something new. I rarely use found imagery now, but I do work with a lot of common objects, changing them in some way to get a different meaning from the objects and to relate them to the bands.”

You can see more of his work on his website and Instagram.

Images: Courtesy of Jason Munn.

Yuya Takamizawa

Thinking about trying our hands at paper cutting. These designs are the works of Japanese cutting artist, illustrator and designer Yuya Takamizawa. His work is influenced by folk art from around the world and Scandinavian design. He creates his work at Atelier Folk where he sells paper cutouts, tenugui (cloth towel), and postcards while his wife sells yeast bread and jam. You can view his work on his website and Instagram. You can also view his wife’s culinary expertise on Atelier Sparrow and on Instagram.

Images: Courtesy of Yuya Takamizawa.

Juho Viitasalo

Love these simple sophisticated Nordic patterns created by Finish industrial designer Juho Viilasalo. He is currently living in Japan and is the chief designer for Propex Design, a design consultancy company in Osaka. He is also the owner and chief designer at Design Viitasalo Ltd. in Finland. The patterns have been used in smart phone cases and furoshiki (wrapping cloth) textile for the Japanese brand, Kotonowa.

Images: Courtesy of Juho Viitasalo.