Category Archives: Installation/display

Bella May Leonard

Bella May Leonard is a mixed media visual artist working with hand embroidery processes and patterns. The UK-based artist creates these ‘sculptural embroidery’ using a variety of items including tape, inner tubing, electrical cables, washing lines, wool and cable ties on punched acrylic sheets. On an interview with Textile Artist she says this about textile art and her chosen medium:

“The sculptural aspect of textile art for me is intriguing; three-dimensional, interweaving threads that build up structure with colour and texture is exciting. Textiles are loaded with history and can communicate to a universal audience, making textile art, to me, very accessible. While it demonstrates considerable thought and consideration even if intuitive, it is an art form realised physically; its tactile nature is captivating.”

“I elaborate on hand embroidery techniques, responding to the materials I choose and collect. I enjoy battling with colour and would describe my process as a collaging technique. Making decisions with colour combinations, scale and shape are made intuitively as I work until I feel a piece is resolved and balanced. I really like using materials that have connotations of previous use, so my process feels resourceful and the work is unique in its experimentation.”

You can follow the artist on her website, Facebook and Twitter.

Images: Courtesy of Bella May Leonard.

Matt W. Moore

Visual artist Matt W. Moore stepped away from his vibrant geometric paintings and street art to create these impressive organic mandalas. This ‘Mosaic Mandala Series’ was created with found natural elements and skillfully arranged into fascinating geometric designs. On his website he explains the project as follows:

“Having spent most of my recent years in cities, and many of my recent months indoors during the wintertime painting on canvas and paper, I decided it was a good play to take full advantage of the sunshine and wilderness and develop a series that would allow me to explore the beauty of Utah, create work with my hands, and celebrate the native color palette of the landscape.”

“This series of mosaic mandalas was created entirely with elements foraged on the mountain and in the valley : River pebbles and stones, shale, red rocks from the high elevations, dead branches from aspen trees, bark from evergreens, cattails from the lake’s edge, dried wild grasses from yesteryear, and cut dead branches exposing the rings of the tree’s life. Everything was right there for me, all I had to do was notice it’s potential.”

You can see more of his work on his website, Facebook, and Instagram.

Images: Courtesy of Matt W. Moore.

Adrian Esparza

Texas-based artist Adrian Esparza disassembles sarape blankets and with wood, nail and enamel reworks the thread to create these colorful geometric installations. On an interview with Glasstire he explains his influence and process:

“My first exposure to art was through craft. Early memories include manipulating Popsicle sticks, carving balsa wood, making ceramics with my grandmother, and seeing my mother sewing clothing and my uncle building guitars. Hands were manipulating objects, and careful calculations were necessary in order to conserve resources and complete a project successfully. Craft laid the foundation for the formal issues that I would later learn in school.”

“Setting this awareness aside, I approach found objects with a kind of assertiveness. Growing up, I remember objects being used again and again, broken objects being restored, and the simplest object becoming valuable. So, I return to the found object and attempt to re-instill a kind of lost value.”

“The sarape pieces are about transformation — about a history that is used in order to construct a new form. They are also about a diffusion of color and the expansion of space. The side-by-side forms create a dialogue while revealing the repetitive process of distance traveled and perhaps even the act of reading itself.”

We could not find a website for the artist but much of his work can be seen here at Taubert Contemporary gallery.

Images: Courtesy of Adrian Esparza and Taubert Contemporary.