Category Archives: Installation/display

Maud Vantours

Maud Vantours, designer and visual artist, lives and works in Paris. She followed an artistic curriculum specializing in textile design and materials research. Over time paper became her favorite material, folding, cutting, accumulating and superimposing to create layers. Her 3D sculptures translates into set designs, fashion accessories, editorial treatments and original graphics.

Much of her work can be found in her website, Facebook, Behance and Instagram.

Images: Courtesy of Maud Vantours.

Debbie Smyth

Debbie Smyth is a textile artist known notably for her pin and thread drawings. She creates the artwork by stretching a network of threads between accurately placed pins. The artist has worked with high profile companies and has exhibited nationally and internationally. In her own words she describes her work:

“On first glance, it can look like a mass of threads but as you get closer sharp lines come into focus, creating a spectacular image. The images are first plotted out before being filled out with the thread, the sharp angles contrasting with the floating ends of the thread.  And despite the complexity of the lengthy process I try to capture a great feeling of energy and spontaneity, and, in some cases, humour.”

” I feel as if I am taking thread out of its comfort zone, presenting it on monumental scale and creating an eye-catching, and in some case jaw dropping effect.”

More of her work can be viewed on her website, Facebook and Instagram.

Images: Courtesy of Debbie Smyth.

Bella May Leonard

Bella May Leonard is a mixed media visual artist working with hand embroidery processes and patterns. The UK-based artist creates these ‘sculptural embroidery’ using a variety of items including tape, inner tubing, electrical cables, washing lines, wool and cable ties on punched acrylic sheets. On an interview with Textile Artist she says this about textile art and her chosen medium:

“The sculptural aspect of textile art for me is intriguing; three-dimensional, interweaving threads that build up structure with colour and texture is exciting. Textiles are loaded with history and can communicate to a universal audience, making textile art, to me, very accessible. While it demonstrates considerable thought and consideration even if intuitive, it is an art form realised physically; its tactile nature is captivating.”

“I elaborate on hand embroidery techniques, responding to the materials I choose and collect. I enjoy battling with colour and would describe my process as a collaging technique. Making decisions with colour combinations, scale and shape are made intuitively as I work until I feel a piece is resolved and balanced. I really like using materials that have connotations of previous use, so my process feels resourceful and the work is unique in its experimentation.”

You can follow the artist on her website, Facebook and Twitter.

Images: Courtesy of Bella May Leonard.