Category Archives: Paintings

Kaori Watanabe

Kyoto-based artist Kaori Watanabe is known for employing both the traditional Japanese style painting (nihongo) and a contemporary style into her work.  She studied at Kyoto Saga University of Arts and has exhibited in numerous solo and group exhibitions.  In 2006 origami motifs was introduced in her paintings.  We were fascinated with this theme of child and origami so we posted a few of her paintings.

You can follow the artist on Tumblr and on Instagram.

Images:  Courtesy of Kaori Watanabe.

Maria Prymachenko (1908 – 1997)

We’ve been remiss and haven’t posted any folk art for quite some time.  We hope to make it up to you by posting these amazing folk art paintings of Maria Prymachenko.  The Ukrainian artist has lived her life in the village of Bolotnya in the Kiev region.  She has never had formal art training but had a natural talent with an overwhelming desire to create beauty.  She is inspired by the fertile plains of the Ukrainian steppe and by Ukrainian folk poetry. On Wikipedia she tells of how her art began:  

“Once, as a young girl, I was tending a gaggle of geese. When I got with them to a sandy beach, on the bank of the river, after crossing a field dotted with wild flowers, I began to draw real and imaginary flowers with a stick on the sand… Later, I decided to paint the walls of my house using natural pigments. After that I’ve never stopped drawing and painting.”

Images:  Courtesy of a variety of sources.

Javier de Riba

Javier de Riba spray paints bright, geometric patterns on cement floors of public spaces.  The Barcelona-based designer and artist works with paints, stencils, roller brushes and volunteers from his workshop to create these beautiful tiled patterns. He says this about his work on Impakter:

“My interest for patterns comes from historical traditions. At the end of the 19th century, hydraulic mosaic factories began to appear in the Catalan countries. Many homes here, in Catalunya, feature this type of tile, and I have lived with them all my life. I wanted to revive this tradition, put it into light and on the street, with a modern touch.”

You can view more of his work on his website, Behance and Instagram.

Images:  Courtesy of Javier de Riba.