Category Archives: Papier

Wirin Chaowana

In awe of these sculptures created by paper craft artist and designer, Wirin Chaowana. The Bangkok-based artist was influenced by Thailand’s traditional fresh flower arrangements. Complex folding and geometric forms replaces the organic flowers in these delicate paper decorations. On an interview with Bangkok Post she reveals this about her project:

“Folding has been my favourite hobby since childhood. I find it fascinating when you can turn a flat, thin sheet of paper into three-dimensional shapes. It creates the perception of depth, light and shadow. It brings paper to life.”

“I fused the beauty of traditional flower arrangements with my personal passion for paper to present Thai flower works in a modern way. The collection is called “Pub Piab Riab Roy” as each word represents the whole construction process. “Pub” is to fold, “piab” means a lot of paper, “riab” is smooth and “roy” is to thread.”

You can see more of her work on Behance and Facebook.

Images: Courtesy of Wirin Chaowana.

Kate Bowles

Artist and craft-maker Kate Bowles created these hand bound notebooks and journals with particular attention to the intricate bindings on the spine. The UK-based maker uses fabric, paper, vintage haberdashery and assorted found materials to create these functional books. We love how she also incorporates embroidery, weaving, smocking, knitting, stitching and darning into her work. You can follow the artist on her blog and on Facebook. The books can be purchased here in her Folksy shop.

Images: Courtesy of Kate Bowles.

Scott Albrecht

Brooklyn-based artist and graphic designer Scott Albrecht has a strong sense of color and typography as can be seen in the three-dimensional pieces shown above. Words play a large role in his designs with phrases incorporated as hidden messages. We’ve featured some of his work on wood but we personally would love to see more of his paper collages. The artist shares some insights on an interview with Frame Web:

“I have a background in graphic design, so a lot of my work tends to incorporate different design elements and principles, like typography, colour-blocking, simplified shapes and forms, etc. Typography has played a larger part in my work over the years, but more recently I’ve been distancing myself from it or exploring new ways of abstracting the characters to create different visual languages.”

“I enjoy finding new ways to communicate with people. For me the hidden messages aren’t so much about hiding things but creating new visual languages. After sharing this newer series with people, it’s been interesting for me to watch or hear people’s reactions. Most people start by observing the shapes and the patterns in the pieces, and then once they discover it’s a system and ultimately a message, I think they connect with the piece on a different level because they’re unpacking and discovering things, which is very different from simply reading the piece right away.”

You can follow the artist on his website and Instagram.

Images: Courtesy of Scott Albrecht.

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