Category Archives: Printmaking

Sabra Field

One of our favorite destination in the U.S. is Vermont so it is fitting that we feature one of their most prominent printmaker, Sabra Field. She was named “an Extraordinary Vermonter” by Governor Madeleine Kunin in 1990 and a “Vermont Living Treasure” by the Shelburne Craft School a decade later. We love her portrayals of the Vermont fields particularly her snow and evening landscapes. On Edgewater Gallery she says this about her career:

“Why did on earth I become a professional artist? No one said I couldn’t and I was too naive to realize the But mostly I wanted to spend all my time making images and I was willing to take the risk. I felt, in a sense, that I had no choice. I couldn’t be happy otherwise.”

“The career highs that sustain me are not glamorous by the standards of the wider world but they confirm that I made the right decision. I’ve reached the time of life artists dream of: a few commissions, sales of reproduction rights, a lot of time to think and dream and invent new images while I still have the strength and energy to make them come true. I hope you will find an image that speaks to you, that you will commit to it and live with it so that we may share that special relationship between artist and collector: I make it but you SEE it!”

You can follow the artist on her website and on Facebook.

Images: Courtesy of Sabra Field.

Annwyn Dean

Annwyn Dean is an embroiderer, book artist and print maker living in the North West of England. She creates artist’s books inspired by her collection of antique lace and embroidery which she has accumulated during many years of teaching. She is also a self taught print maker whose final prints are incorporated into the book format. You can follow the artist on her website and some of her work is available for purchase at Big Cartel.

Images: Courtesy of Annwyn Dean.

Bryan Angus

Scottish printmaker Bryan Angus has been making prints since 2012. The visual artist is based in Banff on the north Aberdeenshire coast – otherwise known as the Banffshire Coast. He has been making prints since 2012 and has found what feels like an entire world of expression in two colors. His inspiration stems from the beauty of the land and the drama of the landscape where he resides. On an interview with Jackson’s Art he says this about linocutting and inspiration:

“It (Linocutting) works very well with the graphic nature of the pictures I make and my drawing skills; I enjoy the carving process, the craft skill adds a fascinating dimension to the making of an image and is very therapeutic to do; lastly, the nature of multiples means my work can be seen further and owned by more people.”

“I’m inspired by the coast where I live, the drama of the land and sea meeting. But the common themes in my work are the character of architecture, the atmosphere of weather and different light conditions and the dynamic spaces we make around buildings.”

You can follow the artist on his website and on Facebook.

Images: Courtesy of Bryan Angus.