Category Archives: Sculpture

Camille Kachani

Camille Kachani is a Lebanese-Brazilian artist currently based in Sao Paolo, Brazil. His artistic practice spans a range of medium that blends his background in photography, painting, economics, and history. We are featuring his unusual sculptures modeled around the themes of nature and art, organic and inorganic, and natural and unnatural. The sculptor uses everyday materials and objects giving them new interpretations with an ironic sense of humor. You can view more of his work here on his website and on Facebook.

Images: Courtesy of Camille Kachani.

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Yoshimasa Tsuchiya

Japanese sculptor Yoshimasa Tsuchiya creates these simple life-size creatures with hush tones giving off an elegant and mysterious aura. The sculpting process start with raw wood blocks carved with power tools which are then shaped, joined together then hand carved for the final details. Plaster and paint is then used to finish off the pieces. The artist is inpired by Japanese folklore, myths and dreams. On Lomography he says this about  mythology:

“I think that mythology is a series of allegorical stories referring the origin of a group of people. Regardless the historical facts, mythologies are always taken over from generation to generation so that we maintain our connections to each other. And I believe that it even exists in our private relationships.”

And on Cargo Collective says this about his chosen medium:

“In Japan, most of traditional buildings and sculptures are made of wood. Wood is a material which breath. It has own age, own viability. I studied these kind of traditional techniques in a graduate school of operative dentistry of cultural assets. I receive some inspirations from an old tale, a myth, a legend and my dream. The figure of my animals is a materialization of human hope, mind and heart.”

Images: Courtesy of Yoshimasa Tsuchiya.

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Simone Crestani

Simone Crestani is an artist, a designer, and a glassblowing master. He had the privilege of working under the tutelage of master glassblower Massimo Lunardon and living close to Venice the capital of the glass world. On Cologni Foundation for the Métiers d’Art he reveals this about his work:

“I started to work with glass when I was very young. I was fifteen when I entered for the first time the Soffieria of master artisan Massimo Lunardon. There I was immediately fascinated by the incandescent glass. Shortly after, I started training as an apprentice blower and it was love at first sight. In 2010 I opened my own studio, the “Atelier Crestani”, where I still work at my creations.”

“I usually take inspiration from the natural world, reinventing its forms and translating them into my language and my aesthetic taste, trying to always keep that pure and elegant style that is my sign.”

“I’ve been working with the borosilicate glass in a more sculptural way compared to the traditional one, and now I can create bigger pieces but more detailed. I’m renown for this particular technique and often I have been asked to teach in prestigious academies and glass-making schools.”

You can view more of his work on his website and on Facebook.

Images: Courtesy of Simone Crestani.

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