Category Archives: Textile

Tammy Kanat

Tammy Kanat is a Melbourne-based artist whose recent work has focused on tapestries woven around an oval-shaped copper frame. These large-scale textile art are inspired by nature, fashion, architecture, objects and other creatives. Each stunning wall hanging is made from hand-woven plush yarns and chunky wool of various thicknesses.  On Color Me Quirky blog she gives this advice to freelancers:

“I was told this story and I would give this advice to all artisans. My friend travelled to the other side of the world to see a famous musician. He came out to sing and play his beautiful instrument however he was very sick with the flu, he played to the crowd and his music was exceptional. At the end of the performance a crowd member thanked him for making the effort to come and sing for everyone even though he was so unwell. The singer looked at the man in the audience totally confused and he said to him. I do not come out on the stage to sing for you I come out on this stage to sing for myself because it makes me feel good and happy. I would say to any artist don’t lose touch with why you originally embarked on your artistic journey! It is great if others can appreciate it but at the core your best work is when you stay true to yourself.”  

You can follow the artist on her website and on Facebook.

Images:  Courtesy of Tammy Kanat.

Darren Ball

UK textile artist Darren Ball received a BA degree in fashion textile from Middlesex Polytechnic and worked as a freelance artist. He taught himself machine embroidery while teaching art and textiles.  His work combines layers of new and historical textiles with stitches of free embroidery to create these incredible stylized images.  

The artist can be found on his website and on Instagram.

Images:  Courtesy of Darren Ball.

Tatiana Nedialkova

Loving these Bulgarian folk tales and Scandinavian-inspired illustrations created by graphic designer and illustrator Tatiana Nedialkova. The artist is based in Brighton, UK and studied at Chelsea College of Art & Design in London.  Her images has been printed onto fabric for kitchen textiles currently sold in her Etsy shop, Softer and Wild.  On the Etsy blog she says this about her process:

“Sometimes I’ll draw my prints by hand, scan them into the computer, and then add more elements; sometimes I draw directly into the software. When I work with shapes, I’ll cut out colorful pieces of cardboard and arrange them on a blank piece of paper, like a collage. I’ll play with different combinations, photograph them, and upload them into the computer. Once I have an illustration I want to work with, I’ll usually print the elements, cut them out, and try to find the right placement for the design on each product. Each surface pattern is made for the specific product it’s going on; I never print rolls of fabric.”

The artist can be followed on Facebook and Instagram.

Images:  Courtesy of Tatiana Nedialkova.