Category Archives: Textile

Alice Wiese

Alice Wiese is a textile artist living and working in the San Francisco bay area. Many of her pieces are inspired by architectural patterns such as tiles, brick and wrought iron fences. Her monochromatic work is repetitive and detailed. Some of her pieces have been sold at the online gallery, Tappan Collective. On an interview with Tappan she says this about her creative process:

“Lately, I have been starting off each piece with a collected pattern or image that I have photographed. I draw it out on my canvas and then begin embroidering. I often change the pattern to make the piece unpredictable. The concepts are constantly circulating in my head. I assign a concept to one piece then deconstruct that thought while working on the piece. I believe that my work is a direct representation of how I feel and each piece is a visual therapy session of my internal monologues.”

“Stretch a canvas and just start. I don’t do any preliminary sketches or plan anything out, I work directly on the canvas. I just go for it. Most of the time the way I thought the piece would evolve is not how it ends up. Most of my pieces are based on repeating patterns I see. As soon as the pattern starts to look too formulaic, I change it up to keep the viewer on their toes.”

Images: Courtesy of Alice Wiese.

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Sissel Blystad

For four decades Sissel Blystad has been a central figure within Scandinavian textile arts. She creates large scale tapestries and shaped textiles using bright colorful hand-dyed wool fiber on board. She is also one of the first textile artist to incorporate digital rendering as composition guide. Much of her ‘drawings with thread’ is abstract built on repetition of small elements. The artist who lives and works in Oslo was educated at the Crafts and Arts School and Bergen Handicrafts School.

Images: Courtesy of Sissel Blystad.

Rebecca Ringquist

Rebecca Ringquist is the Portland-based visual artist and teacher who created the amazing pieces shown above. She uses embroidery as a way of drawing creating colorful abstracts that are often biographical. She has also created these incredible samplers that are availbale in her Etsy shop, Dropcloth. On Chicago Arts-Lifestyle she says this about her interest of fiber arts:

“I found myself taking a very forward-thinking feminist art history class as an undergraduate at Cornell College. Women in Fabric, Fiction and Film explored the role embroidery played in colonial and Victorian times in the development of girls’ lives and the inculcation of femininity. Further, I spent a lot of time studying the feminist art movement of the 1970s.”

“Before this class I was very reluctant to sew, but I became interested in embroidery as a conceptual way to represent ideas about femininity in a subversive manner. I was so excited by the idea that the material could convey its own very important history and meaning.”

“I then attended the Art Institute as a grad student in Fiber and Material studies and began exploring these ideas further.”

You can find Rebecca Ringquist on her website, Facebook and Instagram.

Images: Courtesy of Rebecca Ringquist.

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