Category Archives: Typography

Sara Impey

The sewing machine is the writing tool of textile artist Sara Impey who specializes in machine stitched lettering. The UK-based quiltmaker originally trained as a newspaper journalist inspired by words and narratives. We get an insight on the artist in her interview with Molly Makes:

“I began stitching text in 2004. I had wanted to do so for some time, and tried to find a way of incorporating it into my existing working methods which at the time consisted of elaborate repeated patterns using machine appliqué set against bold geometric backgrounds. I didn’t want the text to be an add-on, but an integral part of the design. My first text-based quilts were simply lists of related words or reproduced verses from Victorian samplers. It was when I started stitching my own writing that I felt I had finally found my ‘voice’ as a quilter – more than thirty years after making my first quilt. It was a very long apprenticeship! The text on my quilts is all free-motion machine stitching, letter by letter. I mention this because these days a lot of people assume it is digital embroidery.”

You can follow the artist on her website. Her book, ‘Text in Textile Art’ is available on Amazon.

Images: Courtesy of Sara Impey.

Nicholas Matej

Hard to ignore the beautiful hand-lettered alphabet created by Cleveland-based freelance illustrator and designer, Nicholas Matej. The letters and numbers are his contribution to the 36 Days of Type project. His work is influenced by nostalgia, craft and the desire to push the limits of his own creativity through new ideas. More of his work can be seen on his website, Instagram, Behance and Dribble. Some of his designs can be purchased on Big Cartel and on Etsy.

Images: Courtesy of Nicholas Matej.


Xavier Casalta

xaviercasaltaFrench graphic designer and artist Xavier Casalta uses a stippling technique with black ink and
thousands of tiny dots requiring as the top illustration says great “patience and discipline”. He uses a 0.10mm pen to create incredible hand lettering and illustrations with most pieces needing hundreds of hours to produce. On Kuuva blog he says this about his process:

“I started (hand-lettering) with solid black, but I’ve always been attracted to realistic drawings. I tried different techniques and the stippling one appeared to be my favourite. Not the best one for productivity but the rendering is really interesting.”

“I guess the process is pretty basic. I start with a simple sketch, with not a lot of details. Once it’s done, I start inking with a first layer to figure out how to place my shadows and volumes. I try to work on small zones to keep the illustration as detailed as possible. Once it’s finished, I clear the entire piece with an eraser.”

You can follow the artist on his website, Facebook, Behance and Instagram.

Images: Courtesy of Xavier Casalta.