Category Archives: Typography

Sim & Zou


Sim and Zou are two French artists based in Nancy, France.  The duo, Lucie Thomas and Thibault Zimmermann, are best known for their installations using primarily their favorite material, paper. In reviewing their projects we found this incredible handmade font created with thread and paper. Weave Type 2 was made with 550 yards of thread and required about 6 hours per letter.

You can see their first weave font and paper projects on their website and on Behance.

Images:  Courtesy of Sim and Zou.

Moshik Nadav Typography


Brooklyn-based Moshik Nadav creates sophisticated type for fashion and luxury brands.  Born and raised in Israel he relocated to Brooklyn, New York and established his studio, Moshik Nadav Typography specializing in high-end logotype and custom typography.  On Creative Pro he has this advice for students of typography and design:

“Get yourself a comfy chair because you are about to spend most of your time on it. Be original, be unique. Show the world something new. Don’t try to be someone else. Don’t mimic your favorite designer. Invent your style and be good at it. Never stop learning even after you graduate.”

You can view his work on his website, Instagram, Facebook and Behance.  His fonts can be purchased on his website.

Images:  Courtesy of Moshik Nadav.

Sara Impey

The sewing machine is the writing tool of textile artist Sara Impey who specializes in machine stitched lettering. The UK-based quiltmaker originally trained as a newspaper journalist inspired by words and narratives. We get an insight on the artist in her interview with Molly Makes:

“I began stitching text in 2004. I had wanted to do so for some time, and tried to find a way of incorporating it into my existing working methods which at the time consisted of elaborate repeated patterns using machine appliqué set against bold geometric backgrounds. I didn’t want the text to be an add-on, but an integral part of the design. My first text-based quilts were simply lists of related words or reproduced verses from Victorian samplers. It was when I started stitching my own writing that I felt I had finally found my ‘voice’ as a quilter – more than thirty years after making my first quilt. It was a very long apprenticeship! The text on my quilts is all free-motion machine stitching, letter by letter. I mention this because these days a lot of people assume it is digital embroidery.”

You can follow the artist on her website. Her book, ‘Text in Textile Art’ is available on Amazon.

Images: Courtesy of Sara Impey.