Klastyling

Whenever we travel to Japan we always bring back a few of these Pochi Bukuro, small envelopes to enclose a token of your gratitude. They come in a wide variety of designs including traditional, seasonal and contemporary. We found these modern designs at Japanese site, Klastyling. We love the simplicity of the designs and felt that this would be a wonderful weekend project. Complete instructions in Japanese can be found here.

Images: Courtesy of Klastyling.

Niharika Hukku

These incredibly delicate paintings on paper and porcelain are the work of Sydney-based artist Niharika Hukku. Her love of nature is apparent in her amazing work creating natural scenes that range from fluffy white clouds to schools of swimming fish. She tells us a bit about herself on an interview on Lost at E Minor:

“I have a degree in fine arts specialising in painting. I fell into a career in illustration very early on and continued to work for over a decade before I shifted my focus to ceramics. Though I enjoyed my job as a commercial artist, I felt the need to do something personal and organic and also wanted to spend more time with clay.”

“My most treasured experience would be my first time on a potter’s wheel. It was exciting and I was impatient to make tall beautiful forms immediately. I still have the first piece I threw on the wheel. While it was small and imperfect, I think it beautiful for it reminds me of all the hope I had for myself in learning something new.”

You can find the artist on her website, Facebook and Instagram.

Images: Courtesy of Niharika Hukku.

Kasia Jacquot

Polish born Kasia Jacquot is a Sydney-based textile artist and surface pattern designer. She is known for her embroidery work often mixing embroidery and silk screen printing in her designs. The artist is greatly influenced by traditional Polish and Eastern European folk arts and folk costumes. She gives us an insight into her work on an interview with Dragonfly Toys:

“My designs nearly always begin with some kind of flower. A center and several petals coming off in different directions. I am always pulled towards symmetry so whatever I draw on the left will be repeated on the right. Constant repetition of leaves, flowers, stems, swirly lines and circles. This kind of drawing is very meditative for me and what I find as I draw is that my eye moves between the detail and the overall design and I am always pulled to the place on the page where balance is required. So I guess for me it is about achieving visual balance through the use of floral patterns. I am also greatly inspired by construction, I studied architecture and briefly worked as a draftsperson. The aspect of order and symmetry, and objects belonging in certain places is part of my process.”

“In Poland paper cutting is everywhere. We used to do it as kids and it featured heavily in common folk art, such as a wall decoration in someone’s home. During religious festivals paper cutting was also used to decorate walls of homes or to make decorations for Christmas trees. It’s been part of my life since I can remember and I really enjoy the quietness of the process and also the joyful surprise I get when I open the folded up and cut up paper to reveal a beautiful design full of (of course) symmetry!”

You can view more of her work on her website, Facebook and Instagram.

Images: Courtesy of Kasia Jacquot.