Ali Ferguson

Admiring these wooden samplers created by UK-based textile artist, Ali Ferguson.
The unique samplers are inspired by “stories from the sewing box”. A huge fan of junk shops and markets she creates the patterns using vintage fabrics, hand embroidered table linens, lace and a variety of found materials. On an interview with Textile Artist she says this about her work:

“Although I would describe myself as a textile artist, I work with a variety of materials. I always incorporate hand stitch into my pieces and I think, for me, this is one of the most important elements. There is something very personal about making your own mark with needle and thread.”


“My choice of materials is influenced by my theme. For example a couple of years ago I was part of an exhibiting group who were working towards an exhibition entitled “Environment”. I chose to explore this by working with driftwood and exploring how I could stitch into it, stitch pieces of wood together and transfer photographic images onto it. This was the start of my “Environmentals” series of driftwood pieces. I am currently back working with wood as I am just starting a series of “Patchwood Quilts” or samplers made from bed slats. This is exciting me greatly and I have loads of further developments buzzing around my head at the moment.”

“As to techniques – let’s just say that these current pieces involve a great deal of drilling!”

You can view more of her work on her website, Facebook and Instagram.

Images: Courtesy of Ali Ferguson.

Scott Albrecht

Brooklyn-based artist and graphic designer Scott Albrecht has a strong sense of color and typography as can be seen in the three-dimensional pieces shown above. Words play a large role in his designs with phrases incorporated as hidden messages. We’ve featured some of his work on wood but we personally would love to see more of his paper collages. The artist shares some insights on an interview with Frame Web:

“I have a background in graphic design, so a lot of my work tends to incorporate different design elements and principles, like typography, colour-blocking, simplified shapes and forms, etc. Typography has played a larger part in my work over the years, but more recently I’ve been distancing myself from it or exploring new ways of abstracting the characters to create different visual languages.”

“I enjoy finding new ways to communicate with people. For me the hidden messages aren’t so much about hiding things but creating new visual languages. After sharing this newer series with people, it’s been interesting for me to watch or hear people’s reactions. Most people start by observing the shapes and the patterns in the pieces, and then once they discover it’s a system and ultimately a message, I think they connect with the piece on a different level because they’re unpacking and discovering things, which is very different from simply reading the piece right away.”

You can follow the artist on his website and Instagram.

Images: Courtesy of Scott Albrecht.

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Patrik Svensson

Love the simple aesthetics of Sweden-based graphic designer and illustrator Patrik Svensson. Much of his work show his passion for art, movies and music. One of our favorite series is his flippable drawings that show two sides of the same story. On an interview with The Raw Book he gives us a glimpse of himself:

“I was born and bred in a small village in the south of Sweden. After having studied lots of different subjects and spent some years at dead-end jobs, I finally managed to build up enough confidence to explore the creative business professionally. Since a few years back, I work full time as a freelance illustrator, primarily in the publishing and advertising industry.”

“One summer some years ago, I worked as a freight forwarder. The job consisted of pressing a key on your keyboard, type some numbers in a blank field on the screen, and then press another key. After having done that 200 times a day, I saw my future dissolve in front of my eyes. One morning on my way to this hell, I came across an ad for a graphic design class. I applied, was admitted and finally started to breathe again, so that would probably be the defining moment–realizing life is too short to not do things that make you spark, basically.”

You can follow the artist on his website, Facebook and Instagram.

Images: Courtesy of Patrik Svensson.