Tag Archives: #embroidery

Le Kadre

Charles Henry and Elin Petronella are the creative couple behind the embroidery business brand, Le Kadre. The French-Swedish team are established artists working together mixing art forms such as photography, embroidery and illustration. Their goal is to continue the exploration of embroidery as a modern art form and to expand their creations to the larger art-scene with exhibitions.

You can see and purchase some of their work on their website and follow them as well on Facebook. You can also find Elin and Charles on Instagram.

Images: Courtesy of Le Kadre.

Adam Pritchett

Botany and entomology are the predominant themes in the embroideries of UK-based textile artist, Adam Pritchett. He studied fine arts at a university and discovered a fascination with hand embroidery after graduating. We get a personal glimpse of the artist in an interview on The Collative blog:

“I’ve always had an interest in textiles in other forms, like knitting and weaving, so embroidery just seemed to be another that really captured my curiosity. It’s a very slow type of art to make, and although it may be relatively straightforward to learn, takes a great deal of time and practice to perfect. It’s taken me around three or four years from first learning, to now.”

“In terms of developing a style of your own, I found this difficult at first, the best way to find your style is to stitch subjects/images that you find interesting and that you want to interpret and just keep working on those subjects. My spiders are my most successful pieces, and I began them completely by accident playing around with fabric, and they continued to grow and change over the last few years. Experiment and have fun with it!”

You can follow the artist on his website, Facebook and Instagram. Some of his pieces can be purchased on his Etsy shop, The Old Needle.

Images: Courtesy of Adam Pritchett.

Wakaba

Found these intricate embroideries on Japanese handmade market site, Minne. We could not find much information on the maker which is typical of many Japanese site. What we were able to gather is that this gallery is known as the handicraft workshop, Wakaba, translated as “new leaves”. You can view more of her exquisite work on her Minne shop site.

Images: Courtesy of Wakaba.