Category Archives: Textile

Glenn Jones

Glenn Jones is a graphic designer and illustrator from Auckland, New Zealand.  His brand name GLENNZ mean GLENN from NZ.  Glenn is a graphic designer and illustrator who, for over 18 years, has worked in the design industry focusing on packaging, illustration and corporate identity.  On his spare time he started creating t-shirt art and then became was one of the best selling designers on Threadless.  He then started his own shirt company selling a range of t-shirts, calendars and laptop skins.  He gives us these incites on his info page:  

Where do you get your ideas from? “It’s my most asked question. The best ideas come when you’re not trying to think of ideas. A lot of it is about nostalgia and trying to look at everyday stuff in a different way.

Do you ever get creative blocks? How do you get over these? “All the time, so I do something else, go for a run, go take photos, go get a coffee. Any one of those options always seems to work.

You can view more of his work on his website, Facebook, Dribble and Instagram. You can purchase his t-shirts here on Threadless.

Images:  Courtesy of Glenn Jones.

Julie Arkell

Julie Arkell is one of England’s best recognized contemporary folk artist.  Born in London, she studied at West Surrey College of Art and Design in Farnham before gaining a diploma in textiles at St Martin’s School of Art.  Julie works in papier mache, mixing vintage fabrics, scraps of poems and words she loves as well as knits and stitching to her imaginative creatures, full of wit and whimsy.  She is inspired by books, toys, clothes, fabric, wool, the radio, walking and being on the constant look out for whatever catches her eyes.

Her work can always be seen at Contemporary Applied Arts, the Loop in London and online on Instagram.

Images:  Courtesy of Julie Arkell.

Debbie Smyth

Debbie Smyth is textile artist most identifiable by her statement thread drawings.  Her contemporary artwork are created by stretching a network of threads between accurately plotted pins. Her work encompasses large-scale wall installations and smaller framed pieces for interiors. She has exhibited both nationally and internationally and has created commissioned work for major companies.  On Barcelona-based magazine, Metal, she says this about her creative process:

“Firstly I do a lot of research, sketches, photos, etc. I then scan all my drawings and begin to piece together compositions to suit the size of the artwork or the shape of the room. With installations, the shape of the space is always the main factor which comes in to play when composing the artwork. I always like to create perspective and create illusions of depth within an artwork. I then go through a thorough planning and plotting process and finally when I am happy with the piece and the planning at a small size, I am ready start pinning/threading. I then begin to upscale the piece from my plans to the wall/backboard. Plotting an outline initially and then filling in places, and building up density, literally drawing with the thread.”

You can follow the artist on her website, Facebook and Instagram.

Images:  Courtesy of Debbie Smyth.

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