Tag Archives: #handcrafted

Ingthings

With so much left-over yarn we decided to make the stripe pillows shown on top.  They are the creation of Ingrid van Willenswaard, a knitter, crocheter, artist and blogger.  Over the years she has made many things from wool to paper.  She has also included many patterns and descriptions of her homemade projects on her blog. The author of three craft books also contributes to Dutch and English magazines in the form of DIY projects and/or illustrations.  This Dutch maker is so successful that she has foregone a full-time job and concentrates solely on her creativity.  In an article on Cosy Project she says this about her craft:  

“I knit and crochet because it gives me a feeling of peace; it’s a kind of meditation, the counting of the stitches and the focus on your hands leaving little room for worries. I don’t have a special goal doing it – it’s just the fun of it.”

“Because I can’t choose what I like most, I make a lot of different things,” says Ingrid. “I like to crochet, to knit, embroider, draw, make cards and fold paper. I am not a specialist – I like to keep things simple and easy.”

You can follow the maker on her blog and on Instagram.

Images:  Courtesy of Ingthings.

Dot to Dot Works

Found this great idea for gift wrapping using a rattan decorative piece that we may try to make. The instructions can be found in the craft book pictured above and distributed by Japanese brand, Dot to Dot Works.  The book is in Japanese written by illustrator and handicraft artist, Horikawa Nami. We can’t read Japanese but the photos make the instructions easy to follow.

You can view more projects on her website, Facebook, Dot to Dot Instagram and Horikawa Nami Instagram.

Images:  Courtesy of Dot to Dot Works.

Chila Bags

The Wayúu (aka Wayu) people inhabit the arid Guajira Peninsula straddling the Venezuela-Colombia border, on the Caribbean Sea coast. Weaving and crocheting make up a large part of their daily life, especially for women.  The tribe produces millions of high-quality artisan products every year playing a vital role in the local economy. They are mostly known for their woven Wayuu bags.  

Found this beautiful collection of bags from Chila Bags, Japan.  “Chila Bags” not only pays legitimate wages, but also provides livelihood support for the contracted ethnic groups.  Bags are an important source of income for the Wayuu people with large families. Purchasing bags packed with great traditions and techniques helps to protect their lifestyle. And Chila Bags ship internationally.

You can find Chila Bags on their website, Facebook and Instagram.

Images:  Courtesy of Chila Bags.

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