Lyndsey McDougall 2

We’ve posted a few of her contemporary embroideries before but we love these embroidered vintage cards that we wanted to share. The artist and part-time lecturer is Lyndsey McDougall from Northern Ireland. We don’t know the background of these pieces but they were posted on her blog five years ago. You can see more of her work on her blog, website and Instagram.

Images: Courtesy of Lyndsey McDougall.

Jessica Light

Jessica Light describes herself as one of the last working passementerie weavers left in England. The artisan uses handmade techniques dating back to the 15th and 16th centuries. She uses traditional yarns and unusual materials often incorporating them with crafts such as macrame, braiding, knot work and beading. In an article on John Lewis she gives us an insight on the start of her career and on her inspirations:

“I set up Jessica Light Trims and Tassels in 2007 with the view to produce trims that were more contemporary and had a design edge to them. I knew that there was a gap in the market for something that used colour and materials in a new way. My most recent collections have featured paper, net, light reflective yarns, and leather. I’ve also used copper pipes, funnels and dolls’ heads for tassel tops; plastic cable ties woven in to make spiky fringes, and made tassels out of newspaper, elastic, and string.”

“My inspiration comes from all over the place. It might be an exhibition, a film, a book, a museum, an historic house, architecture, or sometimes it out of nowhere and I tend to mix ideas together. I don’t like my work to be too literal. I usually have between 2-4 collection ideas in my head in any one time.”

You can see more of her work on her blog and Twitter. Some of her pieces are available for purchase here in her shop.

Images: Courtesy of Jessica Light.

Klastyling

Whenever we travel to Japan we always bring back a few of these Pochi Bukuro, small envelopes to enclose a token of your gratitude. They come in a wide variety of designs including traditional, seasonal and contemporary. We found these modern designs at Japanese site, Klastyling. We love the simplicity of the designs and felt that this would be a wonderful weekend project. Complete instructions in Japanese can be found here.

Images: Courtesy of Klastyling.