Akiko Iwamoto

             We’ve featured her work before on our old blog but we feel her beautiful work is worth a revisit.                    Artisan Akiko Iwamoto learned textile dyed silk weaving at the Museum of Shimane Prefecture, Japan. Her colorful products are all hand made with dyed, split woven and sewn cotton cloth, which have been exhibited on several important venues.

You can follow the artist on her blog and also on Instagram.

Images: Courtesy of Akiko Iwamoto.

Abigail Halpin

Abigail Halpin is a designer/illustrator living in Maine. Graphic design is her background but illustration has always been her first love.  She illustrates by hand using watercolor, pencils and gouache and then makes final adjustments in her computer. She is “inspired by vintage textiles, all things Slavic, mystery novels, the ocean and long-forgotten ephemera.”  The artist is known widely for her intricate paintings but today we are focusing on her embroidery enhanced illustrations.

More of her work can be seen on her website, Facebook and Instagram. Some of her work can be purchased in her Etsy shop.

Images: Courtesy of Abigail Halpin.

Simone Crestani

Simone Crestani is an artist, a designer, and a glassblowing master. He had the privilege of working under the tutelage of master glassblower Massimo Lunardon and living close to Venice the capital of the glass world. On Cologni Foundation for the Métiers d’Art he reveals this about his work:

“I started to work with glass when I was very young. I was fifteen when I entered for the first time the Soffieria of master artisan Massimo Lunardon. There I was immediately fascinated by the incandescent glass. Shortly after, I started training as an apprentice blower and it was love at first sight. In 2010 I opened my own studio, the “Atelier Crestani”, where I still work at my creations.”

“I usually take inspiration from the natural world, reinventing its forms and translating them into my language and my aesthetic taste, trying to always keep that pure and elegant style that is my sign.”

“I’ve been working with the borosilicate glass in a more sculptural way compared to the traditional one, and now I can create bigger pieces but more detailed. I’m renown for this particular technique and often I have been asked to teach in prestigious academies and glass-making schools.”

You can view more of his work on his website and on Facebook.

Images: Courtesy of Simone Crestani.