Clare Celeste Börsch

Clare Celeste Börsch is an American artist based in Berlin.  She is best known for her large-scale paper installations and compositions of flora and fauna.  The artist uses found, photographed, and hand-painted images to create her artworks.  Her work has been featured in hotel lobbies, magazines, on book covers and wine bottles, and has even been made into puzzles. In an interview with Jackson’s Art she says this about her creative journey:

“I used to paint and used collage as a way to plan my paintings. Then one day I realized I liked the collage more and never went back!”

“I begin by collecting, cutting out, and sorting images. I later create series and large works in focused sprints. These bursts of creativity feel, at the time, very intuitive and I get into a flow. But the labour and planning that went in beforehand allow them to happen!”

“Collage also seems a very appropriate medium for me given my life story. Having grown up all over the world, my life has been a collage of sorts. For me, it makes sense to collage a Brazilian butterfly next to a North American flower. In my mind, they are intrinsically connected.”

The artist can be followed on her website and on Instagram.

Images:  Courtesy of Clare Celeste Börsch.

Alighiero Boetti (1940 – 1994)


Firstly, we would like to apologize for the lack of posting.  Had a major computer snafu but now we are up and running again.

Alighiero Boetti was an Italian conceptual artist and member of the Arte Povera movement.  In 1940 he dropped out of business school to study art independently.  He used a variety of materials for his work including ball point pens and postal stamps.  Between 1968 and 1994 the artist created somewhere in the neighborhood of 200 maps.  Many of the maps were embroidered by artisans in Afghanistan and Pakistan.  He also collaborated with them to create other designs including the series,  “Word”.  He writes this about art: 

“Remember to do things that have an inner simplicity, like the sound two small brass symbols make when they strike. This is what needs to make sense of things today. A work is valid when its mechanism is simple and when it is perceived as simple and spontaneous by the viewer, for whom the simplicity of something born from nothing can be astonishing. Depending on who hears it, a small sound such as this can mean a lot or very little.”

You can learn more about the artist here on the Alighiero Boetti Archive is a Cultural Association founded in 1995 on the initiative of the artist’s family.

Images:  Courtesy of various sources.

NeSpoon

Warsaw-based artist Elżbieta Dymna who goes by the name NeSpoon has gained global recognition for her beautifully delicate lace art murals.  Her lace motifs cover the walls, streets, and public parks found in urban environments.  By using intricate doily patterns, the artist beautifies abandoned and unadorned spaces in unlikely urban jungles, transforming them into stunning works of art.  

Why laces? Because in laces there is an aesthetic code, which is deeply embedded in every culture. In every lace we find symmetry, some kind of order and harmony, isn’t that what we all seek for instinctively? 

Why street art? “Because it gives freedom.” 

You can follow the artist on Behance, Facebook and Instagram.

Images:  Courtesy of NeSpoon.