Caitlyn Murphy

There’s beauty in the mundane as can be seen in these paintings by Toronto-based artist Caitlyn Murphy.  The award-winning artist graduated from the Ontario College of Art and Design and has a degrees in both philosophy and illustration.  Her still-life gouache paintings showcase a unique style of realism preferring overlooked, quiet moments as her subject matter and reducing them to their simplest forms.  The artist has had solo and group exhibitions and completed an artist residency in Espoo, Finland.

More of her work can be viewed on her website and Instagram.

Images:  Courtesy of Caitlyn Murphy.

Naoki Onogawa

You can’t really appreciate his work until you look at the details of these paper crane trees.  They are the works of Naoki Onogawa who has been fond of making origami since he was a child.  One year after the earthquake on March 11, 2011, he saw a lot of thousand paper cranes, and the paper cranes were placed in a place that was not in the context of peace or war. He says this about his work:

“Incorporating the origami cranes that I encountered in my childhood into my work, I am creating a “place” for origami cranes. Looking back at it, I feel that the origami cranes are somehow precious and have a mysterious “something” hidden in them. And it was also my belief in “beauty”. Through dialogue with the work, I hope that something that will move your heart will be born.”

You can view more of his work on his website and on Instagram.

Images:  Courtesy of Naomi Onogawa. 

Andrew Faulkner

Admiring these spectacular depictions of our favorite city, San Francisco.  They are the creations of contemporary landscape artist Andrew Faulkner. This Bay Area painter was born into a family of artists, designers, and architects, his paintings fuse the structural sensibilities of his architect father and the often riotous color sense of his interior designer mother. He uses rich color to express a dramatic sense of light and space.  The following quotes from the artist gives us an inkling of his painterly style:

“As a child I celebrated coloring outside the lines. Those loose imperfect marks define my gestural painting style to this day.”  

“Many of my landscapes use what I call an “invented color space” where color is used to break up the composition and achieve a sense of depth and atmosphere that can be open to the interpretation of the viewer.” 

More of his work can be viewed on his website, Facebook and Instagram.

Images:  Courtesy of Andrew Faulkner.

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