Author Archives: Ami

Maru-Maru

Wouldn’t at all mind receiving one of these embroidered cards sold under the brand name, Maru-Maru.  As typical of many Japanese handmade shops very little is written about the maker.   WE can only find this about the maker: “I love cute things!” ︎”I love delicious food! ︎”.  

Her shop can be found here at Minne.

Images:  Courtesy of Maru-Maru.

Yanase Rei

These finely detailed embroidery are the works of Japanese embroidery artist, Yanase Rei. She often hand embroiders flowers and leaf motifs.  Like a painting, you can feel the dignified beauty and dedicated energy from the flowers drawn on the cloth with thread.  The artist has also authored a book entitled, “Embroidery Garden Flowers”.

More of her work can be viewed on Tumblr and Instagram.

Images:  Courtesy of Yanase Rei.

Ilhwa Kim

You have to really get up close to truly appreciate the work of Seoul-based artist Ilhwa Kim. Her work is a spectacular example of contemporary Asian art blending sculpture with painting. Each piece is created through the meticulous process of hand dyeing, cutting and rolling of mulberry paper into unique ‘seeds’. These seeds are then used in their hundreds and thousands to create intricate patterns.  On an interview with Interlocutor she says this about her work:  

“I take it for granted to categorize my work as a “sculpture,” not because of the appearance but because of the working process. In painting, basically the materials are given. However, in my process, all the materials begin from scratch and are ‘‘sculpted” from scratch in various ways. The paper itself has our studio-specific formula — how the paper has to be composed during its manufacture. Every single thing has its own unique process regarding dyeing material, cutting processes involving heavy machines, custom frames, etc.”

“Many paper or textile artists finish their works in gradual steps based on the initial sketch. The process cannot allow sudden bold turns in the middle steps. My studio runs the process in a complete opposite way. In order to give complete freedom during the middle stages of production until completion, all paper units stay unglued until final stage. They can be rearranged or removed or height adjusted whenever needed. The process allows bold changes to be made even when we are very close to final stage.”

More of her work can be viewed on her website and on Instagram.

Images:  Courtesy of Ilhwa Kim.

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