Category Archives: Folk Art

Tatiana Nedialkova

Loving these Bulgarian folk tales and Scandinavian-inspired illustrations created by graphic designer and illustrator Tatiana Nedialkova. The artist is based in Brighton, UK and studied at Chelsea College of Art & Design in London.  Her images has been printed onto fabric for kitchen textiles currently sold in her Etsy shop, Softer and Wild.  On the Etsy blog she says this about her process:

“Sometimes I’ll draw my prints by hand, scan them into the computer, and then add more elements; sometimes I draw directly into the software. When I work with shapes, I’ll cut out colorful pieces of cardboard and arrange them on a blank piece of paper, like a collage. I’ll play with different combinations, photograph them, and upload them into the computer. Once I have an illustration I want to work with, I’ll usually print the elements, cut them out, and try to find the right placement for the design on each product. Each surface pattern is made for the specific product it’s going on; I never print rolls of fabric.”

The artist can be followed on Facebook and Instagram.

Images:  Courtesy of Tatiana Nedialkova.

Zalipie, Poland

Adding Zalipie, Poland to our wanderlust bucket list.  This small village in South-Eastern Poland has an array of small wooden cottages painted in vibrant floral motifs.  Not very much goes unpainted in this hamlet.  Not only are are house exteriors painted but also churches, barns, wells, fences, fountains, bridges, dog houses, interiors and any surfaces available.  It is uncertain how this folk art tradition started but it certainly is worth a visit.

Images:  Courtesy of various sources.

Maria Prymachenko (1908 – 1997)

We’ve been remiss and haven’t posted any folk art for quite some time.  We hope to make it up to you by posting these amazing folk art paintings of Maria Prymachenko.  The Ukrainian artist has lived her life in the village of Bolotnya in the Kiev region.  She has never had formal art training but had a natural talent with an overwhelming desire to create beauty.  She is inspired by the fertile plains of the Ukrainian steppe and by Ukrainian folk poetry. On Wikipedia she tells of how her art began:  

“Once, as a young girl, I was tending a gaggle of geese. When I got with them to a sandy beach, on the bank of the river, after crossing a field dotted with wild flowers, I began to draw real and imaginary flowers with a stick on the sand… Later, I decided to paint the walls of my house using natural pigments. After that I’ve never stopped drawing and painting.”

Images:  Courtesy of a variety of sources.