Category Archives: Weaving

Akiko Iwamoto

             We’ve featured her work before on our old blog but we feel her beautiful work is worth a revisit.                    Artisan Akiko Iwamoto learned textile dyed silk weaving at the Museum of Shimane Prefecture, Japan. Her colorful products are all hand made with dyed, split woven and sewn cotton cloth, which have been exhibited on several important venues.

You can follow the artist on her blog and also on Instagram.

Images: Courtesy of Akiko Iwamoto.

Tracy Wilkinson

Admiring the hand made ceramics created by British designer Tracy Wilkinson. Currently living in Los Angeles, Tracy is the founder of TW Workshop that carries a collection of ceramics, one of a kind furniture, home accessories, and soft cotton t shirts. On an interview with A Piece Apart she talks about her inspiration and her list of rules:

“It’s hard to pinpoint unusual sources because I am always looking at everything and not always connecting how that inspiration will come out in my work. I work with natural materials, and the forms I make are quite organic so most of my inspiration comes from the natural world. On the flipside of that I am also inspired by large industrial machinery, like the machines used in a quarry and hugely inspired by NASA and space rockets.”

“I don’t have a ton of rules, because I would always break them. I have a few I try to keep: Be creative every day, hug my dogs as much as possible, be kind to myself and others, dance as much as possible, don’t be ashamed of watching the telly, keep a tidy workspace, pick funny people as friends and make lists.”

You can see more of her work and purchase her items in her website.

Images: Courtesy of Tracy Wilkinson.

Deloss Webber

Would love to collect a few of these incredible rattan-wrapped stones called, “Small Blessings”. created by Washington state-based artist Deloss Webber. Though he has never had any formal art classes, he has learned rattan weaving from his mother and from an early age has been exposed to and influenced by numerous ethnic forms of weaving. His family operated a furniture business of restoring and repairing antiques, and Webber learned the skill of cane weaving from masters in the trade. His work is influenced by Eastern philosophy and by traditional Japanese and Native American basketry.

You can follow the artist on his website and on Facebook.

Images: Courtesy of Deloss Webber.