Tag Archives: #weaving

Pernilla Works

Found these simple unique products on Japanese online marketplace, Minne.  The textile artist, Naoko, graduated from design school and started selling handmade works while working on designs. She accompanied her husband to overseas assignments and during that time continued to self-teach Nordic weaving. “Eori” is also called “Flemish weaving” and is a very simple technique using a small loom. Warp threads are stretched over a small wooden frame, and weft threads are manually interchanged.

The textile artist can be followed on her website and Instagram.  Her items can be purchased on Minne and Creema.

Images:  Courtesy of Pernilla Works.

Faig Ahmed

Faig Ahmed is an Azerbaijani contemporary visual artist who is best known for his surrealist weavings which integrate visual distortions into traditional oriental rugs.   He alters the patterns with digital manipulation, pixelation, and distortion.  Ahmed’s designs are then manufactured by a group of skilled weavers paying strict attention to traditional Azerbaijani weaving techniques. In 2004 this internationally-recognized artist graduated from the sculpture program at the Azerbaijani State Academy of Fine Art in Baku. He has since exhibited worldwide in group and solo exhibitions. On an interview with Textile Artist he is quoted as follows:

 “Being an artist is not just a job or a profession – It’s a lifestyle. Neither art education or studio work can make you an artist. You have to think as an artist and live a life of an artist to become one. It’s a type of thinking.”

“Things that you need are always surrounded by tons of trash. So, try everything. Never be afraid to experiment. To make really good art you have to get free of all the strings made of concepts and cliché.”

More of his work can be found on his website and on Instagram.

Images:  Courtesy of Faig Ahmed.

Chila Bags

The Wayúu (aka Wayu) people inhabit the arid Guajira Peninsula straddling the Venezuela-Colombia border, on the Caribbean Sea coast. Weaving and crocheting make up a large part of their daily life, especially for women.  The tribe produces millions of high-quality artisan products every year playing a vital role in the local economy. They are mostly known for their woven Wayuu bags.  

Found this beautiful collection of bags from Chila Bags, Japan.  “Chila Bags” not only pays legitimate wages, but also provides livelihood support for the contracted ethnic groups.  Bags are an important source of income for the Wayuu people with large families. Purchasing bags packed with great traditions and techniques helps to protect their lifestyle. And Chila Bags ship internationally.

You can find Chila Bags on their website, Facebook and Instagram.

Images:  Courtesy of Chila Bags.

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