Tag Archives: #handcrafted

Kaiku

We were browsing in the Japanese handmade marketplace, Minne, and found this very unique macramé brand, Kaiku.  Of course very little is known about the maker except that she graduated from Bunka Designer Institute obtaining a color coordinator qualification.  She makes these tapestries with brass and cotton threads.  Her inspiration comes from the hand-knitted presents her grandmother gave her every year.

You can find her shop here at Minne.

Images:  Courtesy of Kaiku Brass-String.

Hine Mizushima

Hiné Mizushima, who was born and raised in Japan, majored in Japanese traditional painting before working as a designer and Illustrator in Tokyo.  She moved to a few prominent cities before settling in Vancouver, Canada where she lives with her family.  She expresses art through slow crafting, needle felting, weaving, making miniature collages, illustrations and puppet stop-motion animations.  We have previously featured her work but it is worthwhile to see her newest creations.  On the Floating Magazine she says this about how she chose to work with varied mediums:

Since graduation, I always have been an illustrator. Then about ten years ago, I was looking for information about some simple GIFs on the internet, but instead of finding that, I stumbled upon ‘How to make a stop-motion video with your digital camera and iMovie.’ It looked interesting and easy, so I made a parody music video with tiny handmade puppets for a song by ‘They Might Be Giants’ (Brooklyn based rock band, of which I have been a big fan for a long time), just for fun. Then I tried to post it on their MySpace page, but I didn’t understand how it worked. But I found a ‘send message’ button instead, so I simply sent them the link to my video. Then a few days later, they contacted me, asking me to work on a video project with them!

Then, when I started to work on the second stop-motion music video for They Might Be Giants, I had to make some needle-felted characters and props for the first time. It was actually a lot of fun, and was easy to create 3D stuff by felting wool. Since then I have been making felt sculptures and stop-motion music videos. If I hadn’t stumbled upon the how-to website and then worked with They Might Be Giants, I probably wouldn’t have even been a crafter. Life is very interesting and unpredictable! At the same time, I started my Etsy shop to sell my handmade felt stuff and prints.

You can follow the artist on her website, Behance and Instagram.  Some of her merchandise can be purchased on Etsy and Society 6.

Images:  Courtesy of Hine Mizushima.

Naoki Onogawa

You can’t really appreciate his work until you look at the details of these paper crane trees.  They are the works of Naoki Onogawa who has been fond of making origami since he was a child.  One year after the earthquake on March 11, 2011, he saw a lot of thousand paper cranes, and the paper cranes were placed in a place that was not in the context of peace or war. He says this about his work:

“Incorporating the origami cranes that I encountered in my childhood into my work, I am creating a “place” for origami cranes. Looking back at it, I feel that the origami cranes are somehow precious and have a mysterious “something” hidden in them. And it was also my belief in “beauty”. Through dialogue with the work, I hope that something that will move your heart will be born.”

You can view more of his work on his website and on Instagram.

Images:  Courtesy of Naomi Onogawa. 

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